Updated October 6, 2018

    This information is provided by the Professors & Researchers Special Interest Group of The Naturist Society.  Please discover all of the other wonderful topics available by entering this site through the front door.


    This article appeared in Nude & Natural 37.1 (Fall 2017).  The list of schools and dates has grown since then--and will be updated as new information comes in.


Nude Swimming in School
by Paul LeValley

    Boys were required to swim nude in many American high schools for about 65 years—from the building of the first indoor school pool in 1913 to the late 1970s.  This remained standard practice in public schools and Catholic schools.  Just about any school large enough to have a pool required nude swimming. 

    I grew up in a Michigan county with little villages and nine high schools—only one of them big enough to have a swimming pool.  My uncles (five and six years older than me) swam nude there, so I was always aware of the practice.  But I attended a small school with no pool.  Years later, I arrived to teach English at Saginaw High School the first year that boys were required to wear suits.

    There are deniers who claim such a thing could never have happened in the U.S.A., yet it certainly did.  Why?

    In Europe, the tradition goes back much earlier.  In the 1830s, Dr. Thomas Arnold (father of the poet Matthew Arnold) revived the ancient Greek tradition of a well developed mind in a well developed body at Rugby school.  Along with other vigorous sports, the boys swam nude in the river.  Of course, Greek boys had attended all of their lessons nude.

    In the U.S., the Young Men's Christian Association led the way in swimming.  The Brooklyn YMCA built the first indoor pool in America in 1885.  All men and boys were expected to swim nude from the beginning—just as they had for thousands of years.  The swim suit had been invented just 16 years earlier, in 1869.  Women and girls had taken to the clumsy outfits—men only on the most crowded beaches, and boys rarely anywhere.

    Mark Twain was writing about Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn skinny-dipping in the Mississippi River.  Photographs in tourist guidebooks and the paintings of George Bellows frequently showed nude boys frolicking in the polluted waters of New York Harbor.  The YMCA was offering slum boys a better place to hang out than pool halls and saloons.  None of those boys owned swim suits, or could afford one.  Nude swimming was democratic, and could be spontaneous.

    Fibers and lint from wool swim suits clogged the early pool filters.  Soon, scientists discovered that swimsuits harbored far more germs than freshly scrubbed skin.  And so, when questioned about their nudity requirement, Y officials gave three reasons:

1.  Cleanliness for the swimmer.
2.  Cleanliness of the pool.
3.  Encouraging a proper attitude toward the body and life.
The third reason would prove the most enduring.

    In contrast, the Young Women's Christian Association neither encouraged nor discouraged nude swimming.  In 1918, the official policy at the Pawtucket, Rhode Island YWCA was "bathing suits permitted."  One YWCA in Vermont even offered beginning swim classes for prepubescent nude boys (taught by a woman in swimsuit).

    In 1913, New Trier Township High School in Winnetka, Illinois opened the first high school indoor pool.  During the 1920s, several of the bigger high schools in the northern states began building indoor swimming pools for all-weather instruction.  Smaller schools never had them.  Since drowning ranked as the second-highest cause of death (after disease) among teenage boys, swimming seemed a good physical exercise to teach—far more practical than football or basketball or baseball.  But swimming almost never became a school subject in the southern states.

    With the number of pools increasing, the American Public Health Association in 1926 issued its first guidelines for maintaining sanitation in school pools.  They recommended that all boys swim nude, but conceded that the insignificant number of girls might wear simple costumes of undyed cotton.  Usually, these were ill-fitting baggy affairs owned and laundered by the school after each use.  Some schools left the suits optional for girls.  All classes were single-sex.

    How could anyone question the morality of a practice already endorsed for 40 years by the Young Men's Christian Association?  By 1937, the Administration of Health and Physical Recreation training manual stated, "Nude bathing for boys is practiced universally; in a few schools girls may swim nude and this is the most sanitary method."

    During the Depression years, the affordability of birthday suits again became an important point.

    With material shortages during World War II, the saving of cloth became a proud patriotic duty.  YMCA camps and countless Boy Scout camps required nude swimming even in the lake.  A few rare schools even allowed the girls to wear skimpier two-piece bathing suits.  Many teachers came out of their war experience, convinced that communal nudity was good preparation for the expectations of military service.

    During the post-war years, it occurred to some people that saving girls from drowning might also be a good idea.  Junior high, and even elementary schools built pools, and required all students to participate—especially in the Great Lakes states.  Again, they were single-sex classes, the boys nude, girls clothed.  Some schools without pools arranged for their students to take swimming instruction at a nearby YMCA or YWCA.  Countless junior highs, high schools, and colleges demanded that all entering students pass a swimming test (the boys nude of course).

    In many high schools, the boys' swim team practiced nude, but wore Speedos during competition.  Yet if both teams agreed, they might compete nude before a mixed-sex audience.  This happened routinely in some parts of the country, never in others.  There are even photographs of mixed swim teams—the boys nude, the girls in swimsuits—but they appear to be of college age.  (Beware of doctored photos.  Most schools drew the line at picture-taking, and insisted on swimsuits one day a year for the yearbook picture; a few of those have since been photoshopped to reflect the everyday reality.  You can usually spot the fakes because the reconstructed penises are too long.)

    A former high school swimmer from Grosse Point, Michigan, recently reminisced, "Senior year (1968) our team did really well and won the state championships.  We had continued to compete nude regularly when a few teams were beginning to insist that their boys wear suits.  (We objected loudly to that idea, and were never forced to suit up.)  But we had to wear suits for the state competition in Ann Arbor.  The boys from St. Joseph (public) HS (rival team) also complained about the suits, but since photographs were going to be published in the papers we all had to comply.  At least we were equally handicapped.  Several of the St. Joe boys were African-American, and in practice they clearly showed that the (somewhat racist) view that they were often well-endowed had some basis in fact.  Nevertheless they suited up as we all did."

    We hear occasional tales of girls sneaking in to peek at the boys (just as boys tried to spy on the girls' locker room.)  And there were exceedingly rare times when the coach fell sick, and the girls' teacher substituted—mostly in the lower grades.  Yet elite members of the male high school swim team were supposed to be above caring, and we do hear of female assistant coaches in Grosse Pointe.  In most schools, the doors were kept securely locked, with no females about.

    Such widespread practice seldom made headlines because it was not news.  In fact, nudist magazines did not even bother to mention anything so taken for granted.  But the few reported stories in the mainstream press are interesting.  For instance, as early as 1909, boys from 40 New York City elementary schools showed up for what was supposed to be a clothed swim competition.  But during the practice rounds, they discovered they could move faster without the suits, so they all discarded them.  The newspaper described the boys as tadpoles.

    In 1940, the Sheboygan Press in Wisconsin ran a big feature on the difference between clothed girls' swimming and nude boys' swimming at Central High School.  They included a black-and-white rear-view picture of a boy on the diving board, then gave his name and even address.  About 25 other nude boys sat in the background facing the camera, but the picture quality was too low to reveal anything.

    On October 16, 1950, Life magazine ran a full-color picture of nude boys playing water volleyball in the new and bigger pool at New Trier High School in Winnetka IL.  They did not even bother to comment on the standard nudity.

    In 1947, the girls (age 9 to 13) in three Highland Park, Michigan elementary schools asked to swim nude like the boys had for years, so they could spend more time in the pool, and less in the locker room.  But after a few weeks of that, some mothers from Liberty School complained to the school board.  One mother testified, "We are all alarmed about this freedom the girls have been given.  There is no telling what it could lead to and we want it stopped at once."  The one woman on the board responded, "No moral issue is involved.  This type of discussion I think is not going to lead to anything constructive to discuss."  The men on the board silently bowed to the wishes of the mothers, and decided that the 150 girls of Liberty School would go back to wearing suits, but the 200 girls at the other two schools could continue to swim nude.

    Mothers at Menasha High School in Wisconsin did not have the same success in 1960.  Some complained that their sons felt embarrassed about being nude around other boys, and wanted swimsuit optionality, the same as the girls enjoyed.  School officials sent questionnaires to 34 schools.  31 responded.  20 schools expected the boys to swim nude.  The other 11 required suits because their pools were outdoors or could not be privatized enough.  The board president stated that the cost of buying and daily laundering of suits for the boys would be prohibitive.  Citing military expectations, board members implied that the boys should learn to act like men, and not hide behind their mothers.  Request denied.

    Then in 1961, the General Director of the Allentown, Pennsylvania YMCA spoke the unspeakable: Improvements in filtration, chlorination, and swimsuit materials made the Y's first two health reasons for nudity obsolete.  All that remained was "encouraging a proper attitude toward the body and life."  The following year, in 1962, the American Public Health Association dropped its nudity recommendation for schools.

    Was that the end of nude swim classes in school?  No way.  Tradition had set in.  Men and boys saw lots of other good reasons to continue the practice.  When a member of the Rockford, Illinois school board suggested ending nude swimming in 1968, a survey of 36 administrators, athletic directors, and swimming instructors found only two educators who thought suits would be a good idea.  With the teachers' union and even the janitors opposed to any change, nude swimming continued there for at least another seven years.

    In September of 1970, advice columnist Abigail Van Buren wrote about boys in their upper teens swimming nude with clothed girls in a family pool:  "It's called the American way of life.  There is something quite natural about boys swimming naked at the local swimming hole, or as in your friends' case, at their own lake front home.  Boys do not require the same degree of modesty as girls, and are, as you have observed, free to relax and enjoy the sun and the water as nature intended.  Many schools and YMCAs utilize this as a policy with boys in swim class and on swim teams.  Rather than attempt to reign in your boys, you should be encouraging them to adapt to this more natural way of life."

    Though a few late developers later complained about traumatic embarrassment, the truth was that most boys enjoyed swimming nude.  The Duluth, Minnesota school board made nudity for boys optional in 1973.  When allowed to vote, the boys in every Duluth junior high chose to continue swimming nude.

    No, what killed nude school swimming was Title IX: equal sports access for girls in 1972.  Good things can have bad consequences.  But implementation was uneven.  At Sarasota High School in Florida, the principal let the boys' and girls' coach each decide the dress code for their classes.  The male teacher said clothed for the boys; the female teacher said nude for the girls all through the early 1970s.

    While a few girls in other places argued for the right to swim nude like the boys did, the solution at most schools was to have mixed-gender classes with everybody clothed.  The YMCA did the same thing.  School boards caved in with the slogan, "Swimsuits rather than lawsuits."  By the late 1970s, bastions of male nude swimming were dropping off fast.

    Later developments added nails to the coffin.  A 1980s panic about teacher molestation didn't help.  Nor did a later tendency to put nude teens and adults on sexual predator lists.  The Gay Rights movement was another good thing that had some bad consequences.  Increased awareness of homosexuality can be blamed for boys today fearing to shower around other boys.  Despite all this, high school wrestlers continued to weigh in nude until 2010—a tradition that ended because of cell phone cameras.  While these changed attitudes stand in the way of a return to nude swimming in school, they came way too late to cause its demise.

    To revisit those times, perhaps the best you can do is talk with older relatives.  Or you can watch the 1985 movie, Heaven Help Us, which includes a nude swimming class in a Catholic high school in Brooklyn during the mid-1960s.  Evangelical protestant schools did not arise until after the nude swim class era was over.  But The Sugar Creek Gang had been a series of Christian novels in the 1940s, 50s, and 60s about a group of boys who always swam nude.  When the books were finally made into a movie series in 2004, all nudity disappeared.

    The loss of nude swimming (whether together or separately) is a significant loss for boys and girls.
    1.  It builds confidence and pride in themselves.
    2.  It helps them understand the varying time-clocks of adolescent growth.
    3.  When mixed, it builds respect for the opposite sex, and appears to reduce teen pregnancy.
    4.  Outside the enclosed pool, it helps them become a natural part of nature.
    5.  It links them with the thousands of generations of humankind who have swum nude before us.
Boys and girls still need these qualities today.

    From newspaper clippings and testimonials on the Internet, I have compiled a list of American elementary, junior, and high schools that definitely required boys to swim nude.  Surely there were many more.  Surely the dates extended far beyond the four years when the testifier attended.

    The tradition died out later than I realized.  End dates for nude swimming at some schools can be documented by people who were there.  Figuring out when nude swimming began at a school is much more difficult, because the earliest participants would be well over 100 years old by now.  Usually, it was the date the pool was built—which varied from school building to school building within the same district.  Such decisions were usually made by the local school board, and applied to all schools in the district that had pools at that particular time.  So far, we know the precise beginning and end dates at only eight schools—mostly latecomers built in the 1960s.

    Help us complete this list.  Please send additional schools and extended dates to paullevalley@peoplepc.com.


Alabama
Mobile
    Murphy HS  1960-63

Arkansas
Little Rock
    Catholic Boys HS  no date

California
Los Angeles
    Thomas Starr King Junior High  1940s
    Los Angeles HS  1940s-ended early 1970s
San Diego
    St. Augustine HS  1962-66
Santa Ana
    Santa Ana HS  1950s-'60s

Connecticut
Windham
    Windham HS  late 1950s

Florida
Sarasota
    Sarasota HS--up to teacher: boys clothed, girls nude  1970-74

Hawaii
Honolulu
    Junior high  1960s

Illinois
Champaigne-Urbana
    Edison Junior High  1960
Chicago  district requirement ended 1972.  Some schools continued past 1980.
    Wright Junior High  no date
    Albert G. Lane Technical HS  1942-ended 1978
    Amundsen HS  1960-64
    Austin HS  1928-68
    Bloom HS  early 1960s
    Dunbar HS  no date
    Fenger HS  early 1960s-1967
    Foreman HS  1960s
    Harlan HS  1966
    Harrison HS  1946-50
    John F. Kennedy HS  1962 (when built)-ended 1979
    Lake View HS  1959
    Mather HS  1964-68
    Morgan Park HS  1964-68
    Roosevelt HS  early 1960s-ended early 1970s
    Senn HS  1964-late1960s
    St. George HS  no date
    St. Patrick HS  1967 (when built)-ended 1980
    St. Viador HS  1970s
    Steinmetz HS  1960s
    Sullivan HS  1965-76
    William Howard Taft HS  1970s
    University of Chicago Laboratory HS  1959-63
    Von Steuben HS  1965-66
    Robert A. Waller HS  no date
Chicago Heights
    Bloom HS  1960s
Cicero
    Morton East HS  ended 1976
Deerfield
    Deerfield HS  1969-72
Des Plaines
    Old Maine HS  1915 (when built)- ended 1930 (when building abandoned)
    Thacker Junior High (same building)  1930-67 (when torn down)
Evanston
    Evanston Township HS  1974-ended 1978
Freeport
    junior high  late 1960s
Glenview
    Glenbrook North HS  1961-1980s
    Glenbrook South HS  1962 (when built)-ended 1977
Harvey
    Thornton Township HS  mid 1970s
Highland Park
    Highland Park HS  1967-71
Hillside
    Proviso West HS  1970s
Lansing
    Thornton Fractional South HS  1971-74
Lincolnshire
    Daniel Wright Junior High  no date
Northlake
    West Leyden HS  1958-80
Oak Park
    Bishop Fenwick HS  1969-73
    Oak Park HS  no date
    River Forest HS  late 1970s
Park Ridge
    Maine East HS  1966
Riverside
    Riverside-Brookfield HS  1969-ended 1977
Rockford
    Jefferson Junior High  1962-75
    Lincoln Junior High  1962-75
    Auburn H S  1962-75
    Rockford East H S  1962-75
    Rockford West H S  1962-75
Streator
    Northlawn Junior High  1974
    Streator HS  1964-68
Warrensburg
    Warrensburg Latham HS  1950 (when built) -70
Waukegan
    West HS  no date
Winnetka
    New Trier Township HS  1913 (when first pool built)-early '80s
        (Later called New Trier East HS)

Indiana
Hammond
    city schools  no date
Indianapolis
    Cathedral HS  1960s
Munster
    Munster HS 1970s

Iowa
Des Moines
    Lincoln HS  1960s-early 70s
Knoxville
    Knoxville Middle School  early 1980s
Marshalltown
    Marshalltown HS  1962
Waterloo/Cedar Falls
    Logan Junior High  no date
    East HS  no date

Kansas
Kansas City
    Southwest HS  no date
    Wyandotte HS  1960s
Topeka
    Topeka HS  1964-68
Wichita
    Wichita North HS  1964-'70s

Maryland
Baltimore
    Baltimore City College HS  no date
    Baltimore Polytechnic HS  1969-ended 1977
    Calvert Hall HS  1966-70
    City HS  1971-74
    Douglas HS  no date
    Eastern HS (all girls)  no date
    Edmondson HS  1962-66
    Loyola HS  1963-67
    Merganthaler HS  late 50s-1963
    Mervo HS  1967-71
    Northern HS  1967-71
    Patterson HS  1968-75
    Southern HS  no date
    Western HS  no date

Massachusetts
Boston
    Boston Boys HS  no date
Gloucester
    Central Grammar (Junior High) School (at the YMCA)  1966-71 (when closed)
Springfield
    John J. Duggan Junior High  1955 (when built)-1961
Westfield
    Westfield Intermediate School  1957-58
Worcester
    Worcester Academy  1915 (when pool built)-ended 1974
    Worcester Boys Trade HS (at Lincoln Square Boys Club)  1930 (when built)-c.1975

Michigan
Adrian
    Adrian Junior High  1963-66
    Adrian HS (optional) 1965-69
Albion
    Washington Gardner HS  1922 (when pool built)-1967 (when abandoned)
Ann Arbor
    Forsythe Junior High  1961-63
    Ann Arbor HS  1963-66
Birmingham
    Brother Rice HS  1964-68
    Cranbrook Institute  1964-68
Dearborn--began district-wide 1928
    Oxford Elementary School  c.1920-c.1979
    Lowrey Elementary and Junior High  1948-54
    Stout Junior High  early 1970s-ended 1976
    Dearborn HS  c.1920-c.1980
    Edsel Ford HS  1955 (when built)-
    Fordson HS  1941-57
    Catholic schools  no date
Detroit
    Longfellow Elementary school (at the YMCA)  1960s
    Durfrey Junior High  early 60s
    Jackson Junior High  late 1950s
    McMichael Junior High  no date
    Tappan Junior High  no date
    Cass Tech HS  1950s-70
    Cody HS  1970s
    Cooley HS  1930s-1968
    Denby HS  1963-68
    Mackenzie HS  1951-69
    Northwestern HS  1930s
    Pershing HS  1966-70
    Southeastern HS  mid 1960s
    Southwestern HS  1963
Ecorse
    Ecorse HS  1967-72
Ferndale
    Lincoln HS  1954-60
Grand Haven
    Grand Haven Junior High  no date
Grosse Pointe
    Brownell Middle School  1950s-1964
    junior high  no date
    Grosse Pointe (South) HS  1950s-68
Grosse Pointe Woods
    University Liggett School 1960s
Hazel Park
    Hazel Park Junior High  1961
    Hazel Park HS  No date
Highland Park  ended mid-80s
    Barber Middle School  1960s
    Ferris Middle School  1960
    Liberty School (age 9-13) long before 1947-69
Ishpeming
    Ishpeming HS  1956- mid-60s
Jackson
    East Junior High  no date
    Frost Junior High  early 1960s-1973
    Northeast Junior High  no date
Lake St. Clair Shores
    Lakeshore HS  1966-68
Lansing
    Dwight Rich Junior High  1963-73
    West Junior High  1962
    J. W. Sexton HS  1965-68
Monroe
    Monroe HS  1930 (when built)-1960
Mt. Clemons
    Mt. Clemons HS  mid-1960s-1968
Muskegon
    Jolman Elementary School  1959
    Bunker Junior High  1965-ended 1977
    Nelson Junior High  no date
    Steele Junior High 1969-72
    Muskegon HS  1957-ended 1977
    Orchard View HS  no date
New Buffalo
    Thornton Township HS  1948-52
Oscoda
    Oscoda HS  1977
Owosso
    Owosso HS  1937-62
    Owosso Junior High (same building)  1962-ended 1975
Pontiac
    Central HS  1962-70
Redford
    Redford HS  1950s-76
Royal Oak
    Dondero HS  1967
Saginaw
    Saginaw HS  ended 1967
Sault Ste. Marie
    Sault HS  no date
St. Joseph
    St. Joseph HS  1964-1968
Traverse City
    Traverse City HS  1966-70
Trenton
    Trenton HS  1966-72
Wakefield
    Wakefield Public Schools  1926-
Warren
    Warren Middle School  no date
    Fitzgerald HS  early 1960s
    Warren HS  no date

Minnesota
Cloquet
    Cloquet High School  no date
Duluth  district requirement ended 1973.
    Lincoln Junior High  mid-1970s
    Ordean Junior High  1967-1971
    Washington Junior High  late 1960s
    West Junior High  ended 1972
    Woodland Junior High  1960s-mid'70s
    Central District HS  1930s-71
    Denfeld HS  1960s
    Duluth East HS  no date
    Proctor HS  ended 1978
Edina
    Valley View Junior High  1956 (when built)-
Hibbing
    Hibbing HS  1924 (when built)-
International Falls
    Falls HS  1970s
Mankato
    Mankato HS  early 1950s-c.1971
Minneapolis
    Bryant Junior High  no date
    Plymouth Middle School  no date
    Minneapolis North HS  1950s-60s
    Washburn HS  no date
Minnetonka
    Minnetonka HS  1970s
Mt. Iron
    Mt. Iron HS  no date
New Hope
    Hosterman Junior High  1970-early '80s
Plymouth
    Plymouth Junior High  no date
Proctor
    Proctor HS  early 1970s-ended 1978
Robbinsdale
    Robbinsdale Junior High  ended 1977
    Sandburg Junior High  no date
    Armstrong HS  no date
    Robbinsdale HS  1969-73
Rochester
    Central Junior High  1970s
St. Louis Park
    St. Louis Park HS  no date
St. Paul
    Highland Park Junior High  1969-71
    Central High School  no date
    Harding HS  ended 1973
    North St. Paul HS  no date
Virginia
    Virginia HS  1968-71

Missouri
Independence
    Van Horn HS  1964-68
Jefferson City
    Jefferson City Senior HS  1926 (when built)-1963 (when abandoned)
St. Louis
    Cleveland HS  1957-61
    Roosevelt HS  1955-59

Nebraska
Lincoln
    Northeast HS  1948

New Jersey
Bergen County
    high school  1971-75
Milburn
    Columbia High School  1950s-1972
South Orange
    Central High School  1950s-1972
Trenton
    Trenton Junior High #3  no date
    Trenton HS  1964-68

New York
Amherst
    Amherst Junior High  1970s
    Amherst Central HS  1952-late 1970s
Astoria
    St. John's Prep School  1960s
Barker
    elementary school  no date
Brooklyn
    Brooklyn Technical HS  1962-67
    James Madison HS  1951-55
    Catholic high school  no date
Buffalo--district-wide 1960s-'70s
    1 report that girls were nude on alternate days in 1967.  Where?
    Windermere Elementary School  early 1970s
    Junior high  late 1960s
    Bennett HS  1957-mid-1960s
Canandaigua
    Canandaigua Junior High  no date
Cheektowaga
    Union East Elementary School  1968
    Cheektowaga Central Junior High 1969-71
    Cheektowaga Central HS  1970-82
Clarence
    Clarence Junior High  early 1980s
Gowanda
    Gowanda Central Elementary School  late 1970s
Hamburg
    Amsdell Jr. High  mid-1970s
    Frontier Central HS  late 1960s
Irondequoit
    Irondequoit HS  1970s
Kenmore
    Benjamin Franklin Junior High  no date
    Herbert Hoover Junior High  1973
    Kenmore Junior High  1972-76
    Kenmore East HS  1974-76
    Kenmore HS  ended 1977
    Kenmore West HS  1976
Lackawanna
    Lackawanna HS  1968-ended 1973
Lockport
    Lockport HS  1960s
Maryvale
    Maryvale HS  no date
New York City
    40 schools (probably grades 5-8) competed nude 1909
    Andrew Jackson HS  no date
    Bayside HS  1953-57
    DeWitt Clinton HS  1971-74
    Jamaica HS  1953-ended 1968
    Monroe HS  ended 1983
Niagara Falls
    elementary school  early 1970s
    LaSalle Junior High  1974
    North Junior High  1976-ended 1978
Ridgewood
    Grover Cleveland HS  1960
Rochester
    Ben Franklin HS  1957-66
    Charlotte HS  1955-ended 1979
    Eastride HS  1968-75
    Edison Tech HS  1960s-75
    Greece Olympia HS  1965-70
    John Marshall HS  early 1960s-70s
    Monroe HS  1958-62
    Thomas Jefferson HS  no date
    West HS  1942-46
Rome
    Rome Free Academy (public HS)  no date
Tonawanda
    Tonawanda Junior High  late 1970s
    North Tonawanda HS  1977
    Tonawanda HS  mid-to-late 1970s
Troy--boys nude in all schools with pools in 1963
    School 12 (K-8)  late 1930s-early 40s
    School 14 (K-8)  no date
    School 16 (K-8)  1960s
    School 18 (K-8)  no date
    Troy High School  1959-65
West Seneca
    West Jr. High  ended 1980
    West Seneca HS  1962-66
Williamsville
    Williamsville North Elementary School  late 1970s-early 80s
    Casey Middle School  early 1970s
    Heim Middle School  no date
    Williamsville Middle School  mid-1970s
    North HS  mid-1970s

North Dakota
Fargo
    Central HS  1950s-60s
Minot
    Central HS  1918 (when built)-1964 (when closed)

Ohio
Akron
    Kenmore HS  no date
Bellevue
    Bellevue Junior High  mid-1970s
Cincinnati
    Oak Hills HS  1960s
    Western Hills HS  1960s-ended 1974
    Woodward HS  no date
Cleveland
    Cleveland Heights HS  ended 1963
    John Adams HS  1959-63
    John Marshall HS  1959-63
    University School  1930s-1950s
Sandusky
    junior high  no date


Oklahoma
Oklahoma City
    Classen Jr/Sr High School  1920s-71  Optional for boys and girls
Tulsa
    Central HS  1920s-76 (when abandoned)

Pennsylvania
Allentown
    Allentown/William Allen HS  1940 (when pool built) -1970
Butler
    Butler Junior High  1962-65
Erie
    Cathedral Prep HS  mid-1970s
Philadelphia
    catholic HS  no date
Pittsburgh
    several junior highs  1960s
    junior high  ended 1981
    Peabody HS  1959-74
    South Hills HS  late-1960s

Texas
Houston
    F. M. Black Junior High  1960-63
    Burbank Junior High  mid-1950s
    Cullen Junior High  no date
    Edison Junior High  no date
    Charles Hartman Junior High  1971
    Jane Long Junior High  1963
    San Jacinto HS  1932-
    Waltrip HS  late 1960s
Meyerland
    Albert Sydney Johnston Junior High  1930-66

Utah
Granite
    Granite High School  1944-48

Virginia
Norfolk
    Norfolk Junior High (bussed to the Navy YMCA)  early 1950s

Wisconsin
Eau Claire
    Delong Middle School  1983-84
Janesville
    Marshall Junior High  1923-74
    Craig HS  1974-81
Kenosha
    Mary D. Bradford HS  no date
Madison
    East HS  1970s
Manitowoc
    Lincoln HS  1950s-70s
Menasha
    Menasha HS  long before 1960-ended late 1960s
Milwaukee
    public HS  1974-78
    Casimir Pulaski HS  1961-63
Sheboygan  1952 allowed swimsuit option at swim meets only
    Central High School  1940-57
Waukesha
    7 elementary schools (at Edison Building Pool)  1945-60
    Horace Mann Middle School  no date
    Waukesha HS South Campus  1961-62

Wyoming
Casper
    Natrona County HS  1926-30

    Again, if you are aware of schools not on this list, or can extend the dates, please contact paullevalley@peoplepc.com.


If you are interested in this topic, you may also be interested in two large books by Paul LeValley:
    Art Follows Nature, A Worldwide History of the Nude  [nude art]
    Seekers of the Naked Truth: Collected Writings on the Gymnosophists and Related Shramana Religions  [ancient naked philosophers in India]
You can read about both of them at http://www.paullevalley.com/books/index.htm.


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